Articles Tagged ‘LWSWorld’

Real World HTML with Marcus Alexander – #LWSWorld

This month, Marcus Alexander of EMC Consulting and Arran Ross-Paterson (of this parish) talk about HTML in the real world, dealing with clients, and what a quality project actually looks like.

LWSWorld - Real world HTML - Marcus Alexander

Everything is designed that way for a reason
Semantic HTML may be brilliant, but all those extra bits are in there for a reason. Until you understand them, don’t mess with them

The best solution is the one that meets the requirements
Clients don’t really care about the technology, just about getting things done on time and on budget. If a solution meets all the requirements, it doesn’t matter how hacky it is, it’s the right solution.

Ask the right questions up front
The client may not have thought of everything, so go through your standard checklist of questions and get everything agreed before you start.

Bugs happen, deal with it
100 bugs in a project is normal, most of them will be problems with other people’s code. Deal with them and try not to let the client get carried away. Products will ship with bugs, just deal with them.

Developers will build a rocket ship to get to Ikea
And then they’ll only leave room in the rocket for a hot dog and some light bulbs. Internal coding standards aren’t very useful, try code reviews and examples of structure instead.

Deployment scripts are your friend
They do all the grunt work for a release for you. Make use of ANT or MSBuild to speed things up.

Finally, thanks to Marcus for a great talk. Update: his slides are on slideshare: http://slidesha.re/980xv4 See my notes on this meetup’s other talk: Arran Ross-Paterson on Why validate

Why Validate? – Arran Ross-Paterson #LWSWorld

This month, Marcus Alexander of EMC Consulting and Arran Ross-Paterson (of this parish) talk about HTML in the real world, dealing with clients, and what a quality project actually looks like.

These are my notes on Arran’s talk:

LWSWorld - Why Validate - Arran Ross-Paterson

Greeted by boos from the crowd, Arran’s controversial talk focused on why we shouldn’t worry that our web sites don’t validate in the W3C checker.

Validation
Browsers don’t care, nor does Google. Unless it’s a requirement, just use it as a sanity checker. Your code doesn’t always have to validate to be valid.

Alt tags
Alt tags never fully describe a picture. There’s no point in having an alt tag on an image if it’s not completely descriptive. If the image is just to attract attention, then don’t worry. If it’s an image map, you will need to add some more description.

Calendars
Calendars look like tables, but they could be a list, and surely it’s ordered, but if you’re doing an event calendar, a definition list is the most semantic markup, except that <dl>s are really hard to style and missing tags can cause problems. Having <dd> inside a <dt> isn’t correct according to the validator, but feels more correct semantically.

Don’t abandon standards
Standards are very useful, so don’t abandon them. They’re great for learning and teaching people, to bring them up to a certain level, but as long as it works, don’t sweat it.

Thanks again to Arran for his talk. See my notes tonight’s other talk: Marcus Alexander’s on real world HTML